IMAGE: EIS Centers for Excellence

ASTRO, or Aerospace Summer Training & Research Opportunity, is specifically geared for high school students. ASTRO participants work in a team of six students to solve Aerospace Engineering design problems. They have access to numerous resources, including our staff with Daily Staff Check-In’s. For the Check-In’s, our staff members rotate each day and are also available on an as-needed basis for any questions. As a result, the students are presented with a great mix of expertise to learn from.

No great summer program is complete without a few fun activities along the way. ASTRO participants enjoy a field trip to GA Tech, movie day, one-on-one talks with staff about college and career advice, and even a little Staff vs. ASTRO Foosball. SEI hopes to further develop the interest these students have shown in the Aerospace Engineering field through this challenging yet fun-filled experience.


Aerospace additive manufacturing (AM), also known as 3D printing, is one of the most active areas of 3D printing right now, with a number of companies producing unique components for use here on Earth and in space. For Enterprise In Space (EIS), work dedicated to AM in space is of particular importance, as it will help humanity further explore and, eventually, inhabit the cosmos. Currently, on the International Space Station (ISS), there are two 3D printers installed by EIS partner Made In Space. The Additive Manufacturing Facility (AMF) is dedicated to commercial projects and will be used for EIS' Print the Future Competition.

Orbital Debris Mitigation and Remediation 
Dr. Kerry Nock
Global Aerospace Corporation

Orbital debris is a growing concern due to the continuous and rapid accumulation of objects in space, including expended satellites, satellite or launch vehicle components, and fragments resulting from the collision between space objects. The number of significant satellite breakup events has averaged about four per year and the cataloged debris population (10 cm in size or larger) has increased at a nearly constant linear rate of 200 objects per year since the beginning of the space age.

As our civilization moves out into the solar system and beyond, will we be ready to govern ourselves in a way better than we have here on Earth? Today we’re joined at The Star Spot on location at the International Space Development Conference 2015 by space policy thinker and Vice Provost for Global Affairs at Ohio University, Lorna Jean Edmonds, who believes, “those who control the galaxy control the world.”